Electrochromic display

Ynvisible gained exclusive rights to RISE's printed electrochromic display IP

In 2020, electrochromics display developer Ynvisible announced that it has entered into a non-exclusive licensing agreement with Sweden's RISE research institutes, to access RISE's printed electrochromic display IP.

RISE now announced that it has given Ynvisible an exclusive license to the display IP. Ynvisible aims to adopt RISE's technology into its high-volume production capability in Sweden. RISE's technology will enable Ynvisible to offer displays that directly compete traditional segmented displays such as LCDs.

Read the full story Posted: May 07,2022

Ynvisible launches an upgraded version of its ePaper display

Portugal-based Ynvisible has released a new version of its ePaper displays. These new displays offer several exciting improvements over the company's previous generation panels.

  • A 10X increase in cycle lifetime - which means the display can survive over a million on-off changes.
  • A lower operating voltage, 1.5V (down from 3V)
  • A 50% reduced power consumption
  • An improved operating temperature range (the displays can now operate at -20 Celsius)
  • Enhanced optical quality and appearance
  • Faster switching speed
Read the full story Posted: Mar 10,2022

Ynvisible and Agiler to develop a smart label to verify UVC surface sterilization

Electrochromics display developer Ynvisible has partnered with Finland-based Agiler Oy to prototype a smart label technology to verify surface sterilization. The label will include a sensor that detects modern ultraviolet C (UVC) sterilization with a low-power ePaper display.

This project will demonstrate a cost-effective, scalable printed and flexible electronics and displays product and it is funded by the European Union Horizon 2020 financial instrument, under the Smartees 2 project. The project aims to conclude within 9 months, and by then the companies expect to have demonstrated a first of its kind solution that can be taken into mass-production.

Read the full story Posted: Oct 03,2020

Laundry greentech developer Mimbly adopts Ynvisible segmented flexible ePaper displays

Electrochromics display developer Ynvisible announced that its displays were chosen by Mimbly, a GreenTech laundry solutions startup. Mimbly will adopt Ynvisible's flexible segmented ePaper displays in its Mibox, a solution that connects to washing machines to recycle water, save energy and capture microplastics.

Mimbly says it chose Ynvisible's displays as these are highly energy-efficient and sustainable, and in addition it offered high freedom of design. The Mimbox display communicates water savings to the users and instruct in the product's use. Ynvisible provided prototyping services to Mimbly, and is now ready to deliver industrial-scale production as Mimbly is rolling out the Mimbox to 22 of the Nordic region's largest property owners (hotels, laundries, cleaning companies, etc) as part of a pilot program to show how the solution works.

Read the full story Posted: Oct 01,2020

Ynvisible signs a license agreement with Sweden's RISE institutes, to expand its product offering

Electrochromics display developer Ynvisible announced that it has entered into a non-exclusive licensing agreement with Sweden's RISE research institutes. Ynvisible will have access to RISE's printed electrochromic displays IP which will enable Ynvisible to complement and expand its product offering.

Ynvisible aims to adopt RISE's technology into its high-volume production capability in Sweden. The new technologies will enable Ynvisible to offer displays that directly compete traditional segmented displays such as LCDs.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 24,2020

Ynvisible raises $1 million, acquires electrochromic display developer rdot

Ynvisible announced that it has acquired the electrochromic display developer rdot, for $123,000 plus time-limited performance remuneration. rdot's two employees will join Ynvisible's team. Ynvisible says that it will adopt rdot's display prototyping business and transfer the technology to its high volume industrial production facility.

Ynvisible also announced that it will be closing a non-brokered private placement to raise gross proceeds of $1.5 million CAD (around $1.08 million USD).

Read the full story Posted: May 20,2020

ePaper displays in 2020 - a market snapshot

Most people when they think about ePaper displays immediate think about E Ink. E Ink Holdings (EIH) has been very successful in bringing its ePaper displays to the market - and today these are prevalent in e-readers, electronic shelf labels, e-notebooks and many other applications. While EIH indeed has a clear leadership in the ePaper market, it is not alone.

But first of all, it is important to note that there are many display technologies that could be called ePaper displays. Most people would only consider truly bi-stable displays able to show dot-matrix images as ePaper displays, but some other technologies that are not truly bi-stable also exist and some consider these as ePaper displays as well - for example Memory LCDs. In addition some simpler displays technologies that are similar to ePaper in properties also exist. We will discuss both these technologies in this article.

Read the full story Posted: May 16,2020

Printed Electrochromics boldly goes where no display has gone before


This is a sponsored post by Ynvisible

Example use-case for printed electrochromics, Ynvisible
Fig.1 Example use case for printed electrochromics: a shock detector smart label with an interactive printed interface.

Expanding Need for Simple Electronic Display Functionality

Rapid advances in the miniaturization and reduction of costs in computing, electronic sensing, and communications have allowed the integration of “smart” electronic functionality into almost everything. ”Intelligence” is now embedded into a wide range of everyday objects, and spread throughout our working and living environments. Much of this intelligence, data collection and transfer is hidden from the human senses, requiring little or no human involvement. But as the number of human daily touch points and interactions with smart devices grows, so too does the importance of user experience design and the role of displays.

Conventional electronic displays cannot be economically and sustainably applied into all smart objects and environments and can often times be functionality overkill for the simple display requirements of many everyday objects. Also, user experiences built around the need for extensive use of separate reading devices, e.g. RFID or Bluetooth readers in smart phones, can be increasingly challenging especially with the high number of distractions and strong competition for attention on mobile screens. Further with a doubling of screen time over the past four years among certain user demographics, there is also a growing sense of screen fatigue leading to people “detoxing” from light emitting screens while still valuing user interfaces that are useful yet unobtrusive.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 01,2020